If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

Middle Tennessee Foot and Ankle Clinics are now Neuhaus Foot and Ankle!

September 2022

Tuesday, 20 September 2022 00:00

Diabetic Foot Conditions

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), diabetes is a condition that affects approximately 23.6 million Americans.  Around 750,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, and the disease’s most common form, Type 2 diabetes, makes up for 90 to 95 percent of these cases.  Type 2 diabetes is especially prevalent among older Americans, those who are obese, and those who lead sedentary lifestyles.

Complications of the disease may lead to several foot and ankle-related conditions.  The loss of nerve sensation, or neuropathy, can cause diabetics to lose feeling at the bottom of the feet and therefore leave them unaware of pain, pressure, and heat.  Decreased circulation is another complication of diabetes that can slow down the healing of wounds and injuries; this can lead to the development of foot ulcers.

To prevent foot ulcers from forming, diabetics should examine their feet every day for small cuts and wear shoes that curtail pressure.  Constant monitoring for the risk factors associated with ulcer formation can allow for early detection and therefore lessen the possibility of ulcers or, even worse, amputation.  The removal of calluses and ingrown toenails should be left to the podiatrist to avoid improper removal and possible infection.

Diabetic patients may also experience foot deformities due to complications in their feet, such as limited joint mobility, muscle atrophy, and decreased fat padding.  These complications can increase pressure in certain areas of the foot, which in turn can cause certain deformities, such as hammertoe, to form.  Another deformity, Charcot foot, develops due to the collapsing of microfractures in the bones of the feet.  The resulting deformity is a foot that is flattened and wider in appearance.

To help minimize pressure and prevent the development of these diabetes-related foot and ankle conditions, your podiatrist may consider using orthotics or special shoes.  Charcot foot may be treated using walkers, custom orthotic insoles, or non-weight-bearing or rigid weight-bearing casts or braces.  In more serious cases, surgery may be considered to treat more developed deformities.  Ulcers can be further cared for with the help of proper diet, medication to control glucose, intensive wound care, and infection treatment.

Tuesday, 13 September 2022 00:00

Swelling of the Feet

There are many reasons why patients experience swelling of the feet. It is rather common and may be a side effect of pregnancy or from sitting and standing for most of the day. Gravity could also play a role in the development of swollen feet. It is known that the weight of blood volume in our bodies is exerted on the veins in the legs and feet. The veins may not work as efficiently during the aging process, and this could make the blood flow backward causing swollen feet. Relief may be found when obese patients lose weight, and it may help to engage in compression therapy by wearing compression socks, stockings, or athletic sleeves. This method can release pressure on the feet and ankles which may help to reduce existing swelling. There are patients who have controlled their swollen feet by implementing healthy lifestyle changes. These can consist of reducing salt intake, incorporating a gentle exercise regime into the daily routine, and drinking plenty of fresh water. Swollen feet may be a temporary condition that affects people who travel via airplane or automobile, so it is beneficial to walk as frequently as possible even though it can be difficult. Swelling of the feet can also be indicative of other health issues so it is important to pay attention to any type of chest pain, mental confusion, dizziness, or fever. If you consistently have swollen feet, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help determine the cause and how to effectively treat it.

Wednesday, 07 September 2022 00:00

Differences between Walking and Running Shoes

Both running and walking are great exercises, but should a person wear the same shoes for both activities? The answer is no, because there is a difference between the way a person’s feet hit the ground when they are walking and when they are running. Therefore, the shoes for each activity are designed differently. Before you begin any exercise program it is always recommended that you speak with your doctor or podiatrist.

Walking is a low impact exercise that is often recommended by doctors to their patients. While walking is a simple activity, it still requires some degree of preparation. If you think about walking and how your feet strike the ground as you move, you will notice that your heel hits the ground first before your foot continues to roll forward and your next step begins. Because of this rolling motion, walking shoes are designed to be more flexible than running shoes. This flexibility helps the walker push off with each step taken.

Because the heel hits the ground first when you walk, walking shoes are designed to absorb most of the shock. Walking shoes should therefore have a beveled or angled heel. The angle of the heel helps absorb the shock and reduces pressure from the ankles. This is especially important for speed walkers, as their feet will hit the ground twice as often as the normal walker.

When people decide to run as a hobby or for their health, they must first realize that running is a high impact exercise. If not done with the proper equipment, running may cause damage to the feet and legs. Running shoes are designed to be more lightweight and to have thicker soles. The thicker soles act as shock absorbers for the rest of the body. Walking shoes often do not have the proper arch support that running shoes do.

A proper fitting shoe can make or break a runner or a walker. If the shoes are too big, their feet will slide back and forth inside the shoe and cause blisters. Whether you will be running or walking, the right equipment can make all of the difference in the world.

Connect with us
our facebook page our twitter page our blog

our recent articles